I haven’t written much because I have been on the road most of the last three weeks. A few weeks a go government of Uganda paid supplements to major newspapers publicising their achievements in the recovery plan for Northern Uganda. I took a trip to the north and east with Isis-WICCE an organisation am currently working with to finish my masters.

These peoples stories tell a different reality. The case is simple not much on the ground yet to cause celebrations and wastage of money to put news ads. That money invested in supplements could have well changed the situation of these people I spoke to and many many others.

But since it is election time here ‘you have to blow the trumpet’ even in situations that are dire. These people’s lives show not much has been done for communities that have faced over a decade of conflict especially those people whose bodies were the battle ground of the war – the women!

Domestic Violence is still a big problem. Everyday the police in the north record high numbers of assault and murders. Women are the worst victims and the whole population has remained traumatised. The recovery plan has not covered immediate problems like trauma and as long as people are traumatised not much can progress. Rosebell's photo.
Ruth Ochieng of Isis-WICCE (Right) and Barbra Otuku talking to a 13 year old boy at a police station in Pader. He was arrested, for the 4th time in a year, for defilement. He is primary four, I was in Senior one when I was his age. The Police have no capacity to counsel him so they keep him in cells. He has a single mother who has enough burdens. Rosebell's photo.
Ruth Ochieng of Isis-WICCE (Right) and Barbra Otuku talking to a 13 year old boy at a police station in Pader. He was arrested, for the 4th time this year, for defilement. He is in primary four, I was in Senior one when I was his age. The Police have no capacity to counsel him so they keep him in cells. He has a single mother who has enough burdens. The community wants nothing to do with him. Where is the future of such children, the sheer victims of circumstances and where is the government plan. Rosebell's photo.
Just a few hours after delivery at Lira Palwo health center. This is a health center that serves about 30,000 people but it had just one nurse on duty, one bed for delivery, no gloves, no medicine. And this is not an isolated incident most health centers I saw nurses have to improvise exposing themselves to HIV in order to help a woman give life. But some admitted sometimes they have to turn away women.
Susan Adongo is a Mid Wife, she was in charge of Palwo health center II alone. The women she helps to deliver often walk more than 20km to reach her. She had only painkillers left the day we visited. Susan risks her life to deliver women in absence of gloves. She had not received her salary for two months. She says the issue of maternal health has not been put as a priority.
The rate of girl child school dropout is high in the north. There are many teenage pregnancies. This young girl was at a health center in Lira after walking distance. There was one nurse on duty and the center has a theatre that is not operational. If she got a complication it would take another 40 km on bad road to get her to a crowded regional hospital.

Some women we spoke to about problems they face after going back home from camps where they lived for about over a decade. Many women talked of reproductive health issues especially fistula which is widespread due to rapes during the war.